Backdating allocation of marital assets into survivor trust

03-Sep-2017 20:19

Other reported problems included suspicious deaths in the military under noncombat conditions; bullying and mistreatment of conscripts by officers and fellow soldiers; allegations of abusive police behavior during arrest and interrogation; and harsh and overcrowded prison conditions.

Arbitrary arrests and lengthy pretrial detention with a lack of transparency for the reasons for detention, a distrust of the veracity of testimony, unclear criteria for release, and an uneven application of rights such as family visitation for detainees occurred.

Print and broadcast media lacked diversity of political opinion, and most television outlets reflected government views. Police reportedly targeted journalists at citizens’ protests.

The politicization of both academic institutions and student activities inhibited academic freedom. Authorities restricted freedom to participate in the political process and political pluralism.

The final status of Nagorno-Karabakh remained the subject of international mediation by the OSCE Minsk Group, cochaired by France, Russia, and the United States.

In a March 2015 report on a wide range of human rights concerns, the commissioner for human rights of the Council of Europe, Nils Muiznieks, stated that he was “struck by the high level of distrust of the families of the victims and civil society in relation to such investigations.” On July 17, the armed group Sasna Tsrer occupied a police compound in Yerevan, demanding political changes.Trials were often lengthy, and courts failed to enforce laws providing for fair trials.Inadequate law enforcement regarding violations of privacy and unlawful searches remained problems.During the two-week standoff that followed, Sasna Tsrer took police and medical personnel hostage for several days and allegedly killed three police officers during the incident: one in the attack, another during the standoff, and a third from the injuries sustained in the attack (see section 1.c., 2.a., and 2.b.).The Special Investigative Service (SIS) launched an investigation into the case based on articles of the criminal code proscribing seizure of buildings and illegal procurement and usage of weapons.

In a March 2015 report on a wide range of human rights concerns, the commissioner for human rights of the Council of Europe, Nils Muiznieks, stated that he was “struck by the high level of distrust of the families of the victims and civil society in relation to such investigations.” On July 17, the armed group Sasna Tsrer occupied a police compound in Yerevan, demanding political changes.

Trials were often lengthy, and courts failed to enforce laws providing for fair trials.

Inadequate law enforcement regarding violations of privacy and unlawful searches remained problems.

During the two-week standoff that followed, Sasna Tsrer took police and medical personnel hostage for several days and allegedly killed three police officers during the incident: one in the attack, another during the standoff, and a third from the injuries sustained in the attack (see section 1.c., 2.a., and 2.b.).

The Special Investigative Service (SIS) launched an investigation into the case based on articles of the criminal code proscribing seizure of buildings and illegal procurement and usage of weapons.

The sides to the conflict also submitted complaints to the European Court of Human Rights accusing each other of committing atrocities during this period.