Dating deal breakers matchmaker

05-Jul-2016 04:28

It felt like what I imagined a date arranged by two overeager parents would be like, something we did out of some mysterious obligation, to say we tried.

The date lasted two hours, and two glasses of wine each.

After the interviews, Erika explained how they find matches for their clients: Matchmakers look at TDR's dating pool database first and also seek out anyone in their extended personal and professional networks who might be a good match, sometimes even going out to appropriate places or events to look for a client's type.

They vet all potential matches in person, trying to make sure there are no deal breakers while also testing for compatibility.

Side note: There is a certain amount of irony to a company that calls itself "a modern take on matchmaking" being named Three Day Rule.

Julia: As the love and relationships editor, my original role was to accompany Jarry on her first visit with Erika, mostly because all my knowledge of matchmaking comes from The Millionaire Matchmaker reruns and that one Fiddler on the Roof song, and I was curious to learn what the process was really like.

Naturally I was curious, because it takes either masochism or extreme confidence to ask someone who just eviscerated another dating service to review yours.

Even, dark stubble lined his jaw, lifted by cheekbones that definitely won the genetic lottery.

He was said to be "looking for a woman who is independent, smart, and unapologetically liberal.

He would love to meet a girl who is creative and has true opinions of her own." I was skeptical, because lots of men say that they want "real" women without realizing that "no makeup" often still means, like, a pinch of blush and concealer, and "true opinions" include ones that might combat their own.

We repeated the interviews with a second matchmaker named Robyn a few weeks later to help them narrow down our prospects, who soon arrived in our inboxes.

Julia: I described all the qualities I'd need a guy I date to have: liberal (and cares about intersectionality), well-read to decently read (or at least won't say "I don't like books all that much," because that has happened to me, at least twice), artistic (but not pretentious/is willing to watch Step Brothers for the 100th time with me), and texts vaguely interesting things on time, arguably the most important trait of all.

Even, dark stubble lined his jaw, lifted by cheekbones that definitely won the genetic lottery.

He was said to be "looking for a woman who is independent, smart, and unapologetically liberal.

He would love to meet a girl who is creative and has true opinions of her own." I was skeptical, because lots of men say that they want "real" women without realizing that "no makeup" often still means, like, a pinch of blush and concealer, and "true opinions" include ones that might combat their own.

We repeated the interviews with a second matchmaker named Robyn a few weeks later to help them narrow down our prospects, who soon arrived in our inboxes.

Julia: I described all the qualities I'd need a guy I date to have: liberal (and cares about intersectionality), well-read to decently read (or at least won't say "I don't like books all that much," because that has happened to me, at least twice), artistic (but not pretentious/is willing to watch Step Brothers for the 100th time with me), and texts vaguely interesting things on time, arguably the most important trait of all.

Coincidentally, the day before our appointment, I had just gone through a small breakup, and, due to watching the movie Serendipity too many times (twice), I crankily took this as a sign.