Dating in reading berkshire

09-Nov-2016 03:10

A bequest of £4,000 was made on identical terms for the setting up of a workhouse in Newbury.In January 1626, the town corporation paid William Kendrick (John's brother) the generous sum of £1,900 for his house and workshops on Minster Street, opposite St Mary's church, and with handy access to the Holy brook and Mill stream.common stock to be employed and bestowed in trade of clothing, either in making of coloured cloathes, or whites, as the time shall require; and also in working of Wooll, Hemp, Flax, Iron, grinding of Brasill woods and other stuffes for Dying, or otherwise, as...

It seems a comfortable and convenient lodging for the Poor, but not always sufficiently aired. Reading Poor Law Union was formed on 10th August 1835.A small amount of residential accommodation was also provided for several employees including the overseers of the weaving and clothworking shops.The workhouse was run by several "undertakers" — local clothiers, appointed by the Corporation, who organised the cloth production for which they received loans from the common stock.Originally a coaching inn, the hotel has been run by the Emmanuel family since 1972, with a focus on providing quality food and excellent service.It has a reputation as one of the finest restaurants in Reading with comfortable rooms.

It seems a comfortable and convenient lodging for the Poor, but not always sufficiently aired. Reading Poor Law Union was formed on 10th August 1835.A small amount of residential accommodation was also provided for several employees including the overseers of the weaving and clothworking shops.The workhouse was run by several "undertakers" — local clothiers, appointed by the Corporation, who organised the cloth production for which they received loans from the common stock.Originally a coaching inn, the hotel has been run by the Emmanuel family since 1972, with a focus on providing quality food and excellent service.It has a reputation as one of the finest restaurants in Reading with comfortable rooms.The first inmates were admitted in August 1867 and by the end of the year the paid medical staff consisted of a nurse at a salary £20 per annum, an assistant nurse, and a nurse for the idiots and imbeciles. Reading then adopted the 'scattered homes' system for its pauper children, setting up a number of homes around the town, including: 82-84 Crescent Road; 'Camarra' and 'Rosemont', King's Road; 109 London Road; 11-13 Milman Road; 59 Queen's Road; 23-25 and 40 Russell Street; 'Wilson' and 'Clifford', South Street; and 'Ashberry' and 'Sutton', Southampton Street.