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He relates developments within the community to changes in society at large, with particular attention to race relations and the civil rights struggle.Venters argues that the Bahá’ís in South Carolina represented a significant, sustained, spiritually-based challenge to the ideology and structures of white male Protestant supremacy, while exploring how the emergence of the Bahá’í Faith in the Deep South played a role in the cultural and structural evolution of the religion. Recommended.-- CHOICE[Venters] shines when he covers the racial, social, and economic milieu of South Carolina at midcentury.-- Journal of Southern Religion Remarkably thorough and clear in telling an important story otherwise unfamiliar to most American historians, so anyone interested in twentieth-century American history, especially in regards to race relations, would be well advised to read this book.APPLICATION FORMS WILL BE UPDATED TO REFLECT THIS CHANGE.IF YOU HAVE A PHYSICIAN OR PA APPLICATION PENDING, WE WILL UPDATE YOUR ONLINE APPLICATION CHECKLIST TO SHOW THAT YOUR REFERENCES ARE NOT PENDING.

The religion, which emphasizes the spiritual unity of all humankind, arrived in the United States from the Middle East at the end of the nineteenth century via urban areas in the Northeast and Midwest.At the school, he took the mantle of student leader and led several marches and demonstrations, including a 1961 event that led to his arrest.Following his graduation that same year, Clyburn moved to Charleston, where he found work as a public-school teacher and employment counselor, and later as director of youth programs.Carefully researched, the story told here fills a significant gap in our knowledge of South Carolina's rich and diverse religious history."--Charles H.Lippy, coauthor of Religion in Contemporary America The emergence of a cohesive interracial fellowship in Jim Crow-era South Carolina was unlikely and dangerous.

The religion, which emphasizes the spiritual unity of all humankind, arrived in the United States from the Middle East at the end of the nineteenth century via urban areas in the Northeast and Midwest.

At the school, he took the mantle of student leader and led several marches and demonstrations, including a 1961 event that led to his arrest.

Following his graduation that same year, Clyburn moved to Charleston, where he found work as a public-school teacher and employment counselor, and later as director of youth programs.

Carefully researched, the story told here fills a significant gap in our knowledge of South Carolina's rich and diverse religious history."--Charles H.

Lippy, coauthor of Religion in Contemporary America The emergence of a cohesive interracial fellowship in Jim Crow-era South Carolina was unlikely and dangerous.

In the nation's capital, the Democrat quickly exerted political clout and over the last two decades has assumed various leadership roles.